Excel Word And Powerpoint For Mac

If you’re working with Office 2011 for Mac, you’ll be glad to know that it’s easy to move your charts from Excel to Word and PowerPoint. You can even create a chart directly in Word 2011 for Mac and PowerPoint 2011 for Mac. Easy is good!

  1. Microsoft Word And Excel For Macbook Pro
  2. Word And Excel For Free

The process of copying Excel charts into Word or PowerPoint is straightforward. Follow these steps:

Excel 2016 for Mac PowerPoint 2016 for Mac Word 2016 for Mac Word for Mac 2011 Excel for Mac 2011 PowerPoint for Mac 2011 More. Office 2016 for Mac support is ending soon. Upgrade to Microsoft 365 to work anywhere from any device and continue to receive support. The data is linked to the Excel source workbook, which remains an independent Excel file. After updating the chart in Excel, in Word you refresh the chart by choosing Edit→Links→Update Links. PowerPoint links update automatically. Selecting the pasted chart in Word or PowerPoint activates the Charts and Format tabs on the Ribbon. Word 6, Excel 5, PowerPoint 4, Mail 3.2. 1994 Office 4.2.1 Word 6, Excel 5, PowerPoint 4, etc. First release designed for the PPC, final release for 68K March 15, 1998 Office 98 (8.0) Word, Excel, PowerPoint 98 October 11, 2000 Office 2001 (9.0 Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Entourage 2001 final release for Mac OS 9, latest update 9.0.6.

  1. Make sure that Excel and the destination application (Word or PowerPoint) are open.

    In Excel, the currently open workbook needs to contain the chart you want to copy to Word or PowerPoint.

  2. Select the chart in Excel by clicking its border.

    The selection indicator is a thick, blue outline replacing the border.

  3. Copy the chart.

    Use any of the usual methods: Click the Copy button on the Standard toolbar, press Command-C, or choose Edit→Copy.

  4. Switch to the Microsoft Word document or PowerPoint presentation.

    Use the Dock or press Command-Tab.

  5. Paste the chart.

    Use any of the usual methods: Click the Paste button on the standard toolbar, press Command-V, or choose Edit→Paste.

  6. Click the small widget in the lower-right corner of the chart.

    A drop-down menu appears. The widget for Word is on the left, and the widget for PowerPoint is on the right.

  7. Choose how you want the chart to behave while it’s living in your Word document or PowerPoint presentation:

    • Paste as Picture or Picture of Chart: Office converts your chart to a picture, and then pastes a picture of the chart into your document or presentation.

    • Excel Chart (Entire Workbook): Pastes a copy of the entire workbook as an embedded OLE (Object Linking and Embedding) object into the Word document or PowerPoint presentation, displaying the chart. Chart colors and fonts adopt document theme colors of the paste destination.

    • Chart (Linked to Data): This is the default option and pastes a chart object in your document or presentation. The data is linked to the Excel source workbook, which remains an independent Excel file. After updating the chart in Excel, in Word you refresh the chart by choosing Edit→Links→Update Links. PowerPoint links update automatically. Selecting the pasted chart in Word or PowerPoint activates the Charts and Format tabs on the Ribbon.

    • Keep Source Formatting: Word or PowerPoint doesn’t apply its existing document theme but instead retains Excel’s source colors and fonts.

    • Use Destination Theme: This is the default paste. The chart adopts the Word document or PowerPoint presentation’s theme.

  8. Click outside the drop-down list to close the widget.

Free

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Word excel powerpoint for macbook air

Macs don't come with that type of apps, so you have to purchase them. There are three options, but there are more if you want to have a look at these applications:


- Office for Mac > http://www.microsoft.com/mac


- Apple iWork, in the Mac App Store.

PowerpointPro


Microsoft Word And Excel For Macbook Pro

- LibreOffice > http://www.libreoffice.org


Word And Excel For Free

All of them are paid apps except LibreOffice, so you can start testing this application. Macs come with TextEdit, a basic text application that won't meet the requirements you want